• Final Seminar Project | MDC cand. Jiyoon Bae | ML Training Pipeline

    Final Seminar Project | MDC cand. Jiyoon Bae | ML Training Pipeline

  • Final Seminar Project | MDC cand. Jiyoon Bae | Result

    Final Seminar Project | MDC cand. Jiyoon Bae | Result


Augmented Intelligence in Design
  • Instructor: Timur Dogan
  • Class Type: Research Seminar
  • When: Spring 2021
  • Link: Classes @ Cornell

Climate change and urbanization require us to rapidly rethink our built environment and the process that we use to design it. This course explores the need for new tools that enable modes of data-driven discovery that will address fundamental questions at the frontiers of science, engineering, architecture, and urban design. This course begins with a series of input lectures from guest speakers from academia and industry (KPF UI, SidewalkLabs, MIT, AIT, and more) and blends seminar and workshop formats to challenge students to envision and develop new tools for augmented intelligence in design that explore the integration of complex phenomena related to sustainability in architecture and urban design (buildings, public space, mobility systems), human wellbeing and comfort and quality of space, during the design process. Students will be using measured, collected, or simulated data and making this information actionable in the design process.

Students will be exposed to a rigorous technical research methodology and a design approach that emphasizes evidence, testing, and evaluation using computational methods. As part of this course, students will learn how to frame a research question and develop an actionable contribution to our field by creating a computational design tool that aims to provide new and significant insight during the design process. Students will develop a demonstrator case study to validate the tool’s accuracy/applicability and summarize their work in a technical research report. Select groups will be invited to submit technical papers to peer-reviewed conferences or journals. Projects will be carried out in small groups and should be understood as a semester-long investigation.